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Wednesday, April 3
 

1:35pm

Session #1: Enhancing Education Beyond the Classroom Experience via Visualization Technologies

ORGANIZERS/MODERATORS:

  • John Taormina,Duke University
  • Mark Pompelia, Rhode Island School of Design

 

PRESENTERS: 

  • Donald Beetham, Department of Art History, Rutgers University

"Assisi and Padua: Worlds Apart (Virtually)"

  • David Hill, Department of Architecture, North Carolina State University

"Bringing the Past Into the Practice: Incorporating Primary Source Materials into Digital Media Education"

  • Bryan Loar, BeecherHill, Columbus, Ohio

"Augmenting Education: The Collision of Real and Virtual Worlds"

  • Steven Tatum, Art & Architecture Library, Virginia Tech University

"Traveling Light: Gathering Information and Cataloging Photographs with Mobile Devices"


Endorsed by the Education Committee

As educational and cultural institutions continue to develop online image collections to support the teaching of visual culture in the expanded classroom, new technologies allow movement beyond the still image to investigate and disseminate visual information from different vantage points: social, economic, political, visual. The power of digital technologies as a means to synthesize, present, and communicate large amounts of information challenges the instructor and researcher to incorporate different ways to interrogate works of art, archaeology, and architecture or develop new visual support tools. This session seeks to explore components and examples of successful collisions between past models and present possibilities for teaching and research.

 


Sponsors
LA

Landslides Aerial Photography

Alex S. MacLean, Founder


Wednesday April 3, 2013 1:35pm - 2:55pm
Grand Ballroom, 17th Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

1:35pm

Session #2: Visual Resourcefulness and the Public Art Challenge

ORGANIZER/MODERATOR:  Helen Lessick, Web Resources for Art in Public

PRESENTERS:

 

Visual resources are key to collections within and outside of the museum and academic worlds. Public art, art in public places, civic art and design, and artist-initiated projects all contribute to a growing national collection.

This session will present the diverse approaches to organizing and presenting public art collections online and discuss the challenges of working with municipal and for-profit clients in the field based on policy, innovation, collaboration and context.

This session will present challenges and opportunities for VRA members to engage the public art field locally and nationally, and build networks for catalogers and public art collection professionals across the nation.


Wednesday April 3, 2013 1:35pm - 2:55pm
Garden Room, 2nd Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

3:05pm

Session #3: Engaging New Technologies

ORGANIZER: Meghan Musolff, University of Michigan

MODERATOR: Betha Whitlow, Washington University in St. Louis

PRESENTERS:


  • Meghan Musolff, University of Michigan
  • John Trendler, Scripps College
  • Betha Whitlow, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Beth Wodnick, Princeton University, Firestone Library

 

Endorsed by the Education Committee

While the seemingly exponential array of new technologies offers the potential to enhance the services we provide, simply keeping up with what is available (or on the horizon) is a daunting process. This fast-paced session will demonstrate a rich variety of new technologies, emphasizing concrete examples that show engagement in professional contexts. Utilizing the expertise of energetic, tech-savvy presenters, this session will introduce new tools as well as creative uses of more established technologies, demystifying them to empower session attendees to further investigate on their own. Emphasis will be given to technologies that can be readily utilized in teaching, learning, and research environments.


Wednesday April 3, 2013 3:05pm - 4:25pm
Garden Room, 2nd Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

3:05pm

Session #4: Every Asset, Everywhere: Perspectives on Digital Asset Management

ORGANIZER / MODERATOR : Elisa Lanzi, Smith College

PRESENTERS:

  • Howard Goldstein, HR Goldstein Consulting, Digital Imaging Strategies
  • Elisa Lanzi, Smith College, Director of Digital Strategies and Services
  • Noah Richman, SRP Phoenix, Media Librarian

 

Are you hearing the terms “DAM, Digital Preservation, and Media Repositories” more and more at your institution? As our organizations increasingly depend on digital content for all areas of business, the need for enterprise-wide digital asset management is being expressed loud and clear. While cultural institutions are just beginning to implement systems for managing and preserving assets, other media communities (broadcasting, advertising, publishing, etc.) have broad experience in this area. This session brings together panelists for a multi-point perspective on DAM and its impact on the Visual Resources community. Topics include: Digital Asset Management systems demystified; Metadata, taxonomy and DAM; and Digital Preservation. In addition, an open dialogue on VR and organizational change with DAM will be moderated by Lanzi.


Sponsors
avatar for Archivision

Archivision

The Archivision Digital Research Library is a unique and fast-growing collection of high-quality images photographed by Scott Gilchrist, a professional photographer, architect, and former VR curator. Our library may be licensed (one time in perpetuity) and built via annual modules... Read More →


Wednesday April 3, 2013 3:05pm - 4:25pm
Grand Ballroom, 17th Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI
 
Thursday, April 4
 

9:05am

Session #5: Reach Out! New Opportunities for the Visual Resource Center

MODERATOR:  Allison J. Cywin, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

PRESENTERS:

  •  Trish Rose-Sandler, Missouri Botanical Garden

“The Art of Life: Data Mining and Crowdsourcing the Identification and Description of Natural History Illustrations from the Biodiversity Heritage Library”

  •   Stephanie Beene, Lewis & Clark College

“From Archive to Digital, from Lone VRC to Collaborative Effort: The case of the Lewis & Clark College Senior Art Collection Online Project”

  •   Charlie McNeil and Allison Cywin, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

“Discovery Beyond Books: Integration of Library and Visual Resource Materials”

In the past several years, visual resource centers across the nation have undergone major transformations from traditional slide libraries to new digital image and multimedia centers.  This transition has brought new audience development strategies and professional opportunities in the form of collaborative partnerships, cooperative ventures and institutional alliances.

This session will highlight four institutions that have expanded the mission of the visual resource center by broadening audience development and outreach through cross-disciplinary partnerships, system integrations, collaborative enterprises and collection building.  The presenters will offer practical experiences describing the successes and challenges of working within a collaborative environment and will provide working models and strategies for audience development.

 

 

 



Sponsors
avatar for Two Cat Digital

Two Cat Digital

Two Cat Digital provides expert digitization services and digital imaging consulting to libraries, museums and archives around the world.  A longtime supporter of VRA, ARLIS/NA and SAH, we look forward to seeing many of you at this year’s conference.  Please have a look at our... Read More →


Thursday April 4, 2013 9:05am - 10:25am
Garden Room, 2nd Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

9:05am

Session #6: Redesigning Visual Resource Facilities for 21st century Challenges

ORGANIZERS: 

  • Randi Millman-Brown, Ithaca College
  • Jon Cartledge, Smith College

MODERATOR:  Jon Cartledge, Smith College

PRESENTERS:

  • Jon Cartledge, Smith College 

“Evaluating the Information Commons Model for Repurposing the Imaging Center” 

  • Elisa Lanzi, Smith College

“Re-imaging the Imaging Center”

  • Randi Millman-Brown, Ithaca College

“Transparencies to Pixels: VRC to VRC”

  • Mark Pompelia, Rhode Island School of Design

“Rebirth of Analog: How the Materials Collection Saved the Visual Resource Center”

  • Caitlin Pereira, Massachusetts College of Art

“Refreshing the VR at MassArt on a Shoestring”

  • Ann Whiteside, Harvard University, Graduate School of Design, Frances Loeb Library

“Transforming the Design Library for the 21st Century”

 

Endorsed by the Education Committee

Transforming visual resource libraries into modern, digital-savvy VR centers can be an exciting but complicated process. New spaces can become collaborative learning spaces for faculty and students and be on the forefront of new technologies. Speakers will present their planned or recent upgrades and remodels to show how they have utilized resources available to create new spaces with new uses, discussing topics that take the audience from space design theory to planning and practice.

 


Thursday April 4, 2013 9:05am - 10:25am
Grand Ballroom, 17th Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

10:35am

Session #7: Digitizing Originals – From Best Practice to Archival Image

ORGANIZER / MODERATOR: Beth Wodnick, Princeton University

PRESENTERS:

  • David Dwiggins, Historic New England
  • Chris Edwards, Yale University, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
  • Tom Rieger, Northeast Document Conservation Center

 

Endorsed by the Education Committee

 

Everyone wants a digital image! Researchers expect to have a plethora of information at their fingertips and from anywhere with internet access. The need for digital imaging in collections has risen exponentially and we, as visual resource professionals, need to embrace the idea that imaging is no longer limited to slide scanning and copy stand photography. Many researchers now expect to have digital images of rare books, special collections, historic photographs and graphic materials, to mention a few, available to them quickly and easily. VR professionals are well versed in the ways of digitizing slide collections, but handling and photographing sometimes challenging original material may be a new frontier.

This session will discuss best practices for photographing original material and creating archival images.  Presenters will also provide examples of established workflows for gathering, photographing, cataloging and archiving these materials.

Tom Rieger , Director of Imaging Services at the Northeast Document Conservation Center, in Andover, Massachusetts, will provide an overview of the best practices for the care and handling of original materials and the best practices for digital imaging, as defined in the FADGI guidelines.  The FADGI guidelines were developed with major imaging centers in mind, but they can be interpreted for use in smaller imaging centers and local initiatives.    This discussion will address these differences.  The range of medias included in the discussion will include all forms of visual media, from rare books through modern photographic media.  An overview of the workflow and digital imaging process at NEDCC will also be presented.

David Dwiggins, Systems Librarian/Archivist at Historic New England, will discuss the evolution of the organization's digitization strategy. As part of its Collections Access Project, the Historic New England has placed images of more than 50,000 items from its collection online since 2010. Although original plans called for outsourcing almost all digitization,  investments in equipment and training allowed the organization to produce archival quality, high-resolution images to supply its website,  publication programs, and external users. The new direction has made the organization less dependent on grant funding for maintaining digitization activities, and has allowed it to develop internal expertise that reduces costs and increases efficiency. Dwiggins will discuss the challenges and opportunities the organization encountered as it built up its digital imaging capabilities from scratch.

Chris Edwards, Digital Studio Production Manager at Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, will discuss his team’s efforts to meet the high demand for digital surrogates of materials for research, web display and publication purposes. The Beinecke Collection is generally too fragile to stand the wear and tear of most traditional mass digitization efforts, and often too valuable to leave the premises for third party digitization so a creative solution was found to meet these high demand needs while still caring for the materials in house. Chris will discuss the implementation of a Rapid Imaging Program creating medium resolution discovery images at the Beinecke Library and how that fits into the workflow while also creating high-resolution, archival images.

 

 

 


Sponsors
avatar for Backstage Library Works

Backstage Library Works

Backstage Library Works provides high-quality, cost-effective, professional library services to help you serve your constituencies. We work with libraries, museums, and archives, large and small, all over the world. Please take a look at our client list and use the tabs above to explore our services... Read More →


Thursday April 4, 2013 10:35am - 11:55am
Garden Room, 2nd Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

10:35am

Session #8: Archaeology Archives: Excavating the Record

ORGANIZER: Jenni Rodda, Institute of Fine Arts/NYU

MODERATOR: Trudy Jacoby, Princeton University

PRESENTERS:

  • Jenni Rodda, Institute of Fine Arts/NYU

"Archaeology Archives and Projects at the Institute of Fine Arts"

  • Shalimar Fojas White, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Wash., DC                     

"Surveying the Survey: Archival Processing, Buildings Archaeology, and Online Outreach"

  • Laurel Bestock, Department of Archaeology and Egyptology, Brown University    

"Issues of collection and dissemination of digital data from the Brown University Abydos Project"

  • Lucie Stylianopoulos, Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia         

"The Digital Dig Continued: ArchaeoCore and the Preservation of Site Metadata"

 

This session, the second in a series, will bring to light important archives associated with archaeological excavations traditionally sponsored by academic institutions. These archives, largely hidden to all but a handful of scholars and usually known primarily by word of mouth, are now being made visible through the use of new technologies and creative collaborations among and within the sponsoring institutions. Speakers will present case studies detailing those collaborations among library, technical services, and digital media staffs that bring these important records to a wider scholarly audience.


Sponsors
avatar for Shared Shelf

Shared Shelf

ARTstor
Shared Shelf media management software enables institutions to manage, store, use, and publish their institutional and faculty media collections within their institution or publicly on the Web. For more information, please see www.sharedshelf.org... Read More →


Thursday April 4, 2013 10:35am - 11:55am
Grand Ballroom, 17th Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

1:35pm

Session #09: Documenting the Art of Africa: Creating New Vocabularies

ORGANIZER: Karen Kessel, Sonoma State University

MODERATOR: Carole Pawloski, Eastern Michigan University

PRESENTERS:

  • Debra Klein, Bard College
  • Jennifer Larson, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Carole Pawloski, Eastern Michigan University

 

Endorsed by the Education Committee

Over 100 years ago, artists like Picasso and Gauguin found novel inspiration for their art in the creative works of art from exotic places like Africa and the South Pacific.  Digital technology has created the ability to more widely share the resources that we manage yet our vocabulary in describing them is limited. Most Western cultures still view traditional arts of the African continent with a Western aesthetic. People are more interested in how the work is formally viewed than its original function or how and why it was created and how it is displayed. There is often much lacking with record descriptions, cataloging and display that would both enhance the work and give viewers a more accurate understanding of each object. More complete records would enhance the usefulness of object records for multiple disciplines. The influence of African art on the work of Western artists could be documented in the object records.  This session will strive to provide these missing elements and further cultural understanding by presenting some of the concerns about the documentation of objects being addressed by current scholars in African art history and related fields. It will touch on the evolving standards and codification of traditional African art, the multiplicity of functionality within objects, and how to better convey meaning through the documentation and contextual display of objects. At the same time, we need to be aware that these cultures may express a need to limit the sharing of information about works that have special significance to their own cultural communities or ethnic groups.


Thursday April 4, 2013 1:35pm - 2:55pm
Garden Room, 2nd Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

1:35pm

Session #10: Eyes Opened: Visual Resources for Visual Literacy

ORGANIZER / MODERATOR: Maureen Burns, IMAGinED Consulting

PRESENTERS:

  • Stephanie Beene, Lewis and Clark College
  • Nicole E. Brown, NYU Libraries
  • Maureen Burns, IMAGinED Consulting
  • Brooke Scherer, University of Tampa

 

With a long history of archiving and providing access to educational images in a variety of media, visual resources specialists have always been attuned to the responsible and meaningful use of images. Our facilities are often key learning spaces for educators and students seeking assistance with associated technical, legal, and aesthetic matters. With twenty-first century teaching placing such importance on visual literacy, information professionals have added instructional activities on this topic to the repertoire of services being provided. To nurture this expanded range of skills and information literacies, visual resources curators partner with instructors and librarians in classroom training activities, offer workshops in how to create meaningful content with new technological tools, and take advantage of other face-time opportunities to promote visual literacy through consultations. Better understanding the expanding base of innovative research and current visual literacy competency standards assists with the identification of functional roles and enhances the effectiveness of such instruction.

What sort of content do we teach? What initial questions do we encourage students to ask? What specific research should become the primary focus? What tools might educators employ for instructing students toward adequate assessments of both preexisting and future cross-cultural visual communication? These questions will be explored starting with background information on cultural definitions, moving to pedagogical theory and the tools of evaluation, then using classroom content and projects to demonstrate how the constructs of graphic design and visual communication are shifting due to the infinite global spectrum. Various examples of how visual media are being used across the liberal arts curriculum will be explored and methods for partnering with faculty to build visual competencies discussed. Concrete ways to use image resources to deepen the integration of information literacy skills and concepts into interdisciplinary instructional situations, especially student orientations, will be demonstrated. Visual literacy standards will be examined with an emphasis on how they specifically apply to the profession and practices of visual resources. In the end, incorporating visual resources into teaching enriches learning by enlivening the classroom and deepening the understanding of core concepts through reflection.

 


Sponsors
avatar for Routledge / Taylor & Francis Group

Routledge / Taylor & Francis Group

Routledge is a global publisher of quality academic books, journals & online reference. We publish hundreds of journals and thousands of new books each year, from offices all over the world. Our current publishing program encompasses the liveliest texts and the best in research... Read More →


Thursday April 4, 2013 1:35pm - 2:55pm
Grand Ballroom, 17th Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

3:05pm

Session #11: Cultural Heritage Data Visualizations: Using Your Data in Interesting Ways

ORGANIZER/MODERATOR :  Joan E. Beaudoin, Wayne State University

PRESENTERS:

  • Joan E. Beaudoin, Wayne State University
  • Chris Alen Sula, Pratt Institute
  • Maximilian Schich, University of Texas at Dallas

 

Endorsed by the Education Committee

 

Data visualization, a graphical means of communicating information by providing insights into underlying phenomena of a data set, is a powerful technique of analysis that has historically been limited to scientific domains. From pointing to network linkages to identifying trends and outliers, current data visualization tools can also offer unique ways to examine information recorded about cultural materials. As VRA members create and manage rich data sets for cultural heritage materials, they have at their disposal the fundamental building blocks needed to create visualizations of networks and/or reveal patterns that are present but hidden in their aggregated data.

This session will provide several presentations on data visualization. The first presentation will include an overview of the processes and techniques used to create the graphical displays of data. Additional presentations will highlight current projects which utilize these tools and methods to work with cultural heritage data, and offer examples of how patterns and networks can be revealed. As the exploitation of data through visualizations is becoming a prevalent technique of analysis in research and industry, attendees would benefit by becoming better informed about these methods. Additionally, as advocates for the cultural heritage sector, VRA members could use these data visualization methods to bring attention to their work and materials.


Thursday April 4, 2013 3:05pm - 4:25pm
Garden Room, 2nd Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

3:05pm

Session #12: Making the Digital Humanities Visual: Opportunities and Case Studies

ORGANIZER/MODERATOR: Sarah Christensen, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

PRESENTERS:

  • John Taormina, Duke University
  • Sarah Christensen, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
  • Massimo Riva, Brown University

 

Endorsed by the Education Committee


The digital humanities are shaping the way that scholars teach and perform research, providing them with tools to answer existing research questions or to pioneer new approaches in their respective fields. This session seeks to explore opportunities in which visual resources professionals can contribute to or initiate digital humanities projects, utilizing specialized knowledge in visual media to form new partnerships with interdisciplinary collaborators.

John Taormina from Duke University will speak about his experience as part of a discussion group called “Digital Technologies and the Visual Arts: Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital Age,” which addressed new media technologies in art history research and teaching with a focus on digital literacy, pedagogy, and scholarly viability. The group met for two years and gained interest from faculty and staff from across campus, and resulted in a week long workshop that has now been offered both at Duke and at Venice International University.

Sarah Christensen from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign will discuss “Explore CU,” an Omeka based mobile app developed by researchers at Cleveland State University. The mobile app and accompanying Omeka site aims to curate the art, culture, and history of Champaign-Urbana through community contributed content.

Massimo Riva, Director of the Virtual Humanities Lab at Brown University, will present the Garibaldi Panorama Project. This project is a “digital archive that seeks to provide a comprehensive resource for the interdisciplinary study and teaching of the life and deeds of one of the protagonists of the Italian unification process (1807-1882), against the historical backdrop of 19th-century Europe, reconstructed with the help of materials from special collections at the Brown University libraries. The project will devote particular attention to the way Garibaldi’s figure, his actions and the Italian Risorgimento as a whole were portrayed in contemporary media.”


Sponsors
avatar for Davis Art Images

Davis Art Images

Davis Art Images works with museums, artists, and photographers to license high-quality, fine art images to educators. Developed solely to support education, our archive covers a variety of time periods, cultures, and art forms. Areas of specialization include modern and contemporary... Read More →


Thursday April 4, 2013 3:05pm - 4:25pm
Grand Ballroom, 17th Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI
 
Friday, April 5
 

10:35am

Session #13: Pedagogical Studies in Visual Literacy

ORGANIZER/MODERATOR: Mark Pompelia, Rhode Island School of Design

PRESENTERS:

  • Diana Carns, University of Massachusetss Dartmouth

"Constructing Meaning: Integrating Text, Images, and Critical Questioning"

  • Ellen Petraits, Rhode Island School of Design

"Visual Literacy for Visual Learners: Relating Research Skills to Haptic Skills"

  • Kelly Smith, Lafayette College

"Image Seeking and Use by Graduate History Students: Avenues to Incorporating Visual Literacy"

  • Sarah Vornholt, University of Hawai'i at Manoa

"Visualizing the Article: An Exploratory Study of Undergraduates' Educational Reactions to Images in Scholarly Articles"

 

Following the popular Visual Literacy Case Studies session that premiered at the 2012 annual conference, this session follows that same purpose while expanding the definition of what it can mean while meeting in Providence, Rhode Island—the Creative Capital, a city that serves as a factory for and of non-traditional learners. As background: A term first coined in 1969, visual literacy, according to the Association of College and Research Libraries “Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education,” “is a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create images and visual media. Visual literacy skills equip a learner to understand and analyze the contextual, cultural, ethical, aesthetic, intellectual, and technical components involved in the production and use of visual materials. A visually literate individual is both a critical consumer of visual media and a competent contributor to a body of shared knowledge and culture.”


 


Sponsors
avatar for Scholars Resource

Scholars Resource

Scholars Resource is your one-stop source for more than 210,000 high-quality, high-resolution digital images of architecture, painting and sculpture for teaching art history and related disciplines. Our website allows for searching across multiple collections from prominent image... Read More →


Friday April 5, 2013 10:35am - 11:55am
Garden Room, 2nd Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI

1:35pm

Session #14: Broaden Your Impact: Making Collection Content More Openly Accessible

ORGANIZERS:

  • Cara Hirsch, ARTstor
  • Anne Young, Indianapolis Museum of Art

 

MODERATOR:

  • Anne Young, Indianapolis Museum of Art

 

PRESENTERS:

  • Ian McDermott, ARTstor
  • Nancy Sims, University of Minnesota
  • Deborah Wythe, Brooklyn Museum
  • Anne Young, Indianapolis Museum of Art

 

In recent years, many cultural institutions have struggled to figure out how to make their collection content more broadly accessible in light of intellectual property constraints, technological challenges, and other institutional resistances. This presentation will be twofold providing both theory and hands-on skills to help guide you through the process and address a number of common questions: How do you determine whether you have sufficient rights to make content more openly accessible? How do you secure permissions if you do not already have them, and what type of permissions should you seek? Can you rely on fair use, and if so, when do you invoke its use? How do you navigate making content more broadly accessible in the face of institutional resistance? What are the best avenues for your institution to distribute your collection content externally? Each presenter has handled these issues at their own institution and will discuss these topics in light of their own experiences during the panel session.

The panel session will be followed by an intensive workshop (FEE: $75 / Limited to 40 attendees) to take you through many of the steps and resources to open the access to your collections.


Sponsors
avatar for Gallery Systems

Gallery Systems

Gallery Systems provides collections and media management software and services for visual resource libraries and museums of any size or type. Our powerful, easy-to-use solutions organize and manage information and publish content from the database to the Web. Our EmbARK application... Read More →


Friday April 5, 2013 1:35pm - 2:55pm
Garden Room, 2nd Floor Providence Biltmore, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI